Food

Beetroot and Black Bean Burgers – Vegan

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Having seen these at the supermarket the other day, I decided to try my own version, without the preservatives and flavourings! Let me know what you think.

40527968 - veggie beet and quinoa burger with avocadoIngredients;

  • 1 x large onion (finely diced)
  • 2 x garlic cloves (crushed)
  • 2 x 400ml cans cooked black beans or 1 x cup uncooked black beans or adzuki beans, soaked and cooked (= 3 cups)
  • 1 x large beetroot grated
  • 1/2 cup chickpea flour, oat bran, or cooked quinoa
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp chili powder (or add extra cumin)
  • 1/4 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1/3 cup crushed walnuts or almonds – optional for added protein
  • 2 x tsp salt
  • 3/4 cup finely chopped mushrooms- optional

 

Method;

  1. Preheat your oven to 200 degrees celcius
  2. Mix all the ingredients together in a large bowl, or gently pulse in a food processor until combined. Only mix enough to combine, if it’s overdone the mix will get too sloppy.
  3. Press the mixture firmly into a 1/4 cup measuring cup and place it on an oven tray that’s been greased or lined with baking paper. Flatten the burgers.
  4. Bake the burgers for 15 minutes (fan forced if you have it) or 20 minutes if you don’t.
  5. Turn the burger patties over and bake for 5 more minutes on the other side. They may need extra time if they are thick or you like themn firmer. You can put the wholegrain buns in now so they get deliciously warm and crunchy.
  6. If you prefer a browner, crisper burger patty, finish them off either under the grill, on the BBQ plate or frypan with a bit of coconut oil.

Notes

  • You can keep the pre-cooked patties for another night either in the fridge or freezer (if freezing store with baking paper between) and finish them off on the BBQ or in a frypan.
  • Alternatively, you can cook half the batch now and par-bake the other half for 15-20 minutes at 190 degrees celsius then freeze as above. When needed, simply place the frozen patty on an oven tray lined with baking paper and bake at 190 celsius foir another 25 – 30 minutes

 

Copyright: <a href=’https://www.123rf.com/profile_sarsmis’>sarsmis / 123RF Stock Photo</a>

Raw Flaxseed Crackers-Paleo, Low Allergy

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linseeds

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (150g) flaxseeds (aka; linseed)
  • 2 tbsp (40ml) ground flaxseed (linseed) meal or almond meal (use only linseed meal for low allergy)
  • 3/4 cup (190ml) water
  • 2-3 tsp (10-15ml) Himalayan salt, tamari or soy sauce

Optional;

  • 3 tsp (15 ml) maple syrup (or honey)
  • pinch of onion powder (about 1/6 tsp)
  • pinch of garlic powder
  • ½ cup grated parmesan cheese (avoid for low allergy)
  • 1 tsp minced fresh rosemary (avoid for low allergy)
  • Himalayan salt for sprinkling

Dehydrator Method;

  1. Mix the flaxseeds and flaxseed (or almond) meal in a bowl.
  2. Combine the water, salt or tamari, sweetener, and any of the optional ingredients, except the salt for sprinkling, in a container and mix until everything is thoroughly combined.
  3. Pour the water mix over the flaxseed mix and stir thoroughly.
  4. Leave to sit for 10 to 15 minutes, until the mix becomes thickened, but not too stiff.
  5. Spread mix thinly over one dehydrator tray and score lightly with a spatula.
  6. Sprinkle with salt
  7. Dry for 12-36 hours at 40-45°C, flipping crackers once after 5-6 hours (optional).
  8. Break crackers along score lines and store in an air-tight container.

Oven Method;

  1. Preheat oven to 170 – 190 C.
  2. Prepare a large baking tray by lining with baking paper or use a silicon mat
  3. Follow steps from 1 – 6
  4. Scoop the mixture out on to your lined baking tray or silicone mat.
  5. Cover the mix with baking paper, use a rolling pin to roll the mix to an even thickness. Try to roll the mixture to no more than 5mm thick. This takes some patience as you need to push the dough back together if it breaks up.
  6. Using a sharp knife, deeply score/cut your dough along desired cracker shapes. This allows you to break the end result into nice tidy pieces.
  7. Bake in the oven for approximately 30-35 minutes (check to make sure they are not burning). The thicker the mix is the longer it will take to bake. You can turn them over after 15 minutes to cook the yunderlayer if you like.
  8. Remove from oven and allow to cool completely, then break into crackers.
  9. Store in an airtight container for up to two weeks.
These are yummy with savoury or sweet ricotta (watch out for my recipe for home-made goats ricotta with herbs and garlic!), or any kind of cheese or nut butter!
flaxseed-crackers-mine-cropped
Photo courtesy of Jessica Higgs

Powder Free Protein Shakes

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protein-shake

 

Ingredients;

  • 1 banana, peeled
  • mango (optional to have instead of banana)
  • handful of berries (optional)
  • 150g low-fat natural yoghurt or soya yoghurt
  • 100ml of milk or dairy-free milk
  • 1/2 cup of silken tofu
  • 1 tbsp peanut butter, nut butter or loose nuts and seeds
  • 1 tbsp chia seeds
  • dessicated coconut (optional)
  • raw cacao (optional)
  • ½ tsp cinnamon (or to taste)
  • ice cubes on hot days!

Method;

Using a powerful blender, either a stick blender that chops ice (and nuts in this case) or thermomix or other strong kitchen blender, blend until smooth (about 1 minute).

Non-Dairy Sources of Calcium

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What is the best way to get enough calcium, in your diet, when you don’t eat dairy?

Luckily it’s not that hard as there are plenty of great foods that are packed with calcium.

For men and women between 19 years of age and 50 (or 70 for men), the recommended dietary intake is 1000mg. For women over 50 and teenagers between 12 and 18 years it’s 1300mg.

Calcium is often adequately supplied by the diet, as it’s found in so many food sources, but it may cause deficiency symptoms because the body is actually lacking other synergistic nutrients such as vitamin D (increases calcium absorption and utilisation) and magnesium (also very important to have in the correct ratio with calcium to ewnsure calcium utilisation).

I usually recommend an hair, tissue, mineral test before supplementing with calcium, as excess calcium, that is out of solution and not doing it’s proper job, may cause other health problems such as heart and kidney issues.

Excessive caffeine, alcohol, salt, grains (due to phytates binding with calcium), lack of exercise and smoking can all reduce calcium in your bones.

List of non-dairy foods rich in calcium;

  • Dark leafy greens

watercress

  • Kale

kale

  • Fish with bones such as sardines and tinned salmon

sardines

  • Tofu

tofu-and-broccoli

  • Almonds and almond milk

almond-milk

  • Seeds such as sesame, sunflowers and pepitas

sesame-seeds

  • Dandelion root

dandelion-root

  • Seaweed

sushi

Potassium Rich Foods

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potasium-rich-foods

 

Potassium is a mineral found in almost all foods in varying amounts. The richest sources of potassium are vegetables, especially the green leafy varieties.

Potassium is an electrolyte as is; sodium, chloride, calcium and magnesium.  Electrolytes help to conduct electrical charges throughout the body.

Potassium is particularly important as the heart and nervous system can completely shut down if levels get too high or low. Most of us get enough potassium in our diet, but a diet low in fruits and vegetables can become compromised.

Our kidneys are constantly keeping electrolytes in a healthy range in our blood. There can be a number of factors which may impact on potassium levels, so it always worth keeping an eye on the levels. As the blood is usually kept within a healthy range it may be more beneficial to have a hair, tissue, mineral analysis to determine potassium levels outside of the blood.

Foods rich in potassium;

  • Apples
  • Apricots
  • Artichoke
  • Asparagus
  • Avocadoes
  • Banana
  • Beet greens
  • Berries
  • Broccoli
  • Brussel Sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Celeriac
  • Celery
  • Cherries
  • Chillies
  • Citrus fruits
  • Coconut Water
  • Dairy
  • Dates
  • Eggs
  • Fish (all types)
  • Garlic
  • Ginger
  • Grapes
  • Kefir
  • Lentils
  • Melon
  • Milk
  • Mushrooms
  • Nuts; almonds, cashews and pecans
  • Onions
  • Parsnips
  • Passionfruit
  • Pears
  • Potato
  • Raisins
  • Red meat
  • Sardines
  • Seeds such as; sunflower seeds, pepitas, sesame
  • Soy including; milk, beans, tofu and tempeh
  • Spinach
  • Sweet potato
  • Tomatoes (sundried)
  • Turnips
  • White Beans
  • Yoghurt

 

Low Amine and Salicylate diet

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The itchy dirty dozen include;
amines-1

  1. Dairy especially cow’s milk
  2. Grapes; wine (sorry!), sultanas,
  3. oranges and orange juice
  4. Kiwi fruit
  5. Soy sauce and Tamari
  6. Tomatoes, fresh, cooked and canned or in sauces
  7. Avocado
  8. Dark leafy greens (broccoli, spinach, kale, silverbeet, rocket, watercress, mesclun salad mix and wheatgrass juice.)
  9. Dried fruits
  10. Deli meats (bacon, ham, sausages, salami anythign made with preservatives, flavourings and nitrates)
  11. Corn and products containing corn
  12. Junk food such as lollies etc

For the first few weeks try to stick to the following list of allowable ingredients as much as  possible.

 

List of allowable ingredients;

Fruit;
Papaya
Pawpaw
Bananas (not sugar bananas)
Peeled fresh or tinned pear
Peeled fresh or tinned apple (not initially)

Vegetables;
Iceberg lettuce
Cabbage; red & white
Cos letuce
Celery
Chokoes
Green string beans
Snow peas
Mung Bean sprouts
Spring Onions
Swedes
Parsley
Chives
Leeks

Garlic (not imported)

Fresh beetroot (not initially)

 

Meat;
Meat should be as fresh as possible, it’s usually better to buy it from the butcher, rather than the cryovac packed meat in the supermarkets as this may be weeks old.
Organic or at least free range will be best. Don’t keep leftovers.
Avoid the skin on chicken and the fat on all meat. If buying mince, ask the butcher for preservative free.

  • chicken,
  • turkey
  • lamb
  • beef

Bone Broth (this is a link to the recipe, just leave out the apple cider vinegar, tomatoes, carrots, onions, bay leaf and thyme);

https://equilibriumnaturalhealth.com/2016/05/26/bone-broth/

 

Fish;

Fresh white fish such as

  • flathead,
  • small fillets of Barramundi
  • dory,
  • bream
  • flounder
  • herring (fresh, not preserved in a jar)
  • lobster ($$!!)
  • oysters


Grains;
Buckwheat (flour and pasta)
Spelt
Brown or Basmati rice
Quinoa (not puffed)
Rolled oats
Oat or Rice bran
Barley
Rye

Linseeds/flaxseeds                                                                                                                                             Gluten free pasta

Biscuits or crackers;                                                                                                                       

Rye ryvita’s

Plain or wholegrain rice cracker and rice cakes
Legumes;
  • lentils
  • white beans such as cannelini or Lima

These can be canned or fresh and then soaked. Avoid kidney beans and broad beans

Chocolate replacement;

Carob powder or pieces

 

Oils;
Rice bran oil
Ghee (after first week)
Flaxseed oil (refrigerated, organic, cold pressed, only used cold, never heated)
Sweeteners;
Rice malt syrup
Golden syrup
Vanilla bean
Carob powder or pieces

Real maple syrup (not maple flavour)

Milks;
Non-dairy milk and yoghurt;
Almond milk
Soy milk (Soy milky is the closest to regular milk in flavour, although it can separate if heated too much)
Beverages;
Rooibos tea
Decaf coffee
Sample menu;

Mornings;

Start the day with warm water

Smoothies; have plain soy yoghurt with banana (not sugar bananas), red papaya (rather than pawpaw) and soy milky

Bircher muesli (grated or chopped pear rather than apple, no berries, dairy yoghurt or milk, dried fruit, no nuts  or dessicated or shaved coconut)

https://equilibriumnaturalhealth.com/2016/05/04/bircher-muesli/

Porridge (with allowable ingredients only);

https://equilibriumnaturalhealth.com/2016/05/26/porridge-using-soaked-oats/

Decaf coffee with soy milky or Rooibos tea

 

Lunch;

Salad; iceberg lettuce with celery, red or white cabbage, sliced celery, mung beans and spring onions.

Cooked peeled white potatoes with green beans, chokoes and chives on the top.

Finely sliced cabbage is nice mixed through mashed potato.

Home made hash browns are good too.

Potato and leek soup,
Roast chicken (without the skin), with pasta and salad
Quinoa salad with freshly cooked meat and allowable salad ingredients
Rye crispbread, Sourdough wraps or rice cakes with meat, lettuce and other allowable vegetables
Fresh white fish fillets with potato bake (you can use non-dairy milk, leeks and garlic to make this) and salad from allowable vegetables
G.F Pasta with allowable ingredients

Dinner;

Same as lunch.

Keep a food diary while you’re on the restricted 2 or so weeks and then when you are re-introducing foods. Don’t start re-introducing foods until your eczema has cleared up.

Re-introducing other foods;
Re-introduce one food only at a time and wait 2 days, if no symptoms you can re-introduce the next. If there are symptoms, stop eating the food and wait until the symptoms have healed. Keep a record of which foods you can tolerate and which ones you can’t.
Histamine levels in food;
Salicylate levels in food;