Immune System

Making Kimchi

Posted on Updated on

Porridge using soaked oats

Posted on Updated on

Jar of oats

Ingredients:

 

  • 1 cup oats, rolled or cracked – NOT the quick cooking kind, but the ‘old fashioned’ whole oats (organic is best)
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 2 Tblespns plain whole milk yogurt, whey, kefir or buttermilk
  • 1 cup water

OPtional Extra’s;

  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • 1 Tblespns ground nuts & seeds such as; Brazil, almonds, walnuts, pepita’s, sunflower seeds & flax seeds.(Don’t use these if diverticulitis is an issue)
  • Adding psyllium husks, chia seeds and slippery elm will increase the fibre content. (Don’t use chia seeds if diverticulitis is an issue)
  • Coconut sugar, rapadura sugar, raw honey or real maple syrup (not maple flavouring) to sweeten.
  • Touch of butter, ghee, cream or milk, optional, but especially good for the kids
  • Other nice optional additions include; grated apple, chopped dried fruit such as; sulphur-free apricots, figs, sultanas or cranberries.

healthy breakfast ingredients

Preparation:

 

Mix the oats with warm water and whey or yogurt, cover and leave out (preferably not in the fridge unless the nights are hot) for at least 7 hours or overnight. In the morning, bring an additional cup of water to a boil with the sea salt. Add the soaked oats, reduce the heat, cover and simmer for several minutes. Remove from heat, stir in optional flax seeds and other fibre and let stand for a few minutes. Serve with the ghee, butter or cream and sugar, honey or real maple syrup.

 

Embed from Getty Images

 

Image courtesy of Mister GC at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of KEKO64 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Bone Broth GAPS and Paleo friendly

Posted on Updated on

Meat stew

BONE BROTH

Ingredients

  • 2 kg of bones – (beef and lamb knuckle bones or marrow bones, chicken necks, whole or carcass from a roast. You can have different bones together or separate, depending on the flavour of stock you’re after)
  • 8 litres of filtered water
  • 1 x whole bulb of garlic; cloves, separated, peeled and crushed
  • 3 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar (organic, unfiltered)
  • 2 x carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • 2 x celery stalks, coarsely chopped
  • 2 x onions, halved and peeled
  • 1 x can whole, peeled or diced tomatoes (optional)
  • 2 x bay leaves
  • 1 x bunch fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • ½ bunch fresh or dried thyme
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Place all ingredients in a large crockpot or slow cooker and set the heat to high.
  2. Bring the stock to a boil, then reduce the heat setting to low.
  3. Allow the stock to cook for a minimum of 4 hours and up to 24-48 hours or more, (depending on the size of the bones, chicken will need less, lamb and beef can cook for longer). The longer the bones brew the better! Remember to keep topping up the water you as you don’t want it to boil dry.
  4. Turn off the cooker and allow the stock to cool slightly.
  5. Strain the stock through a fine mesh metal strainer and throw away all the debris (I often keep the chunks of meat if they’re easily removed, and add them into a soup)
  6. Place the cooled stock into glass jars for storage in the fridge (for up to a few days) or pour into freezer-safe containers for later use. I also freeze some in ice-cube trays so that I can add a couple of cubes to cooking as needed.

When the broth is fully cooled, look for a gelatinous consistency. That means your broth is gelatin-rich!  Sometimes the gelatin breaks down if the cooking is longer or hotter and your broth won’t appear gelatinous, but it is still full of gelatin and other wonderful minerals. I don’t skim off any of the fat, I heat my broth and drink it warm.  If you like, you can skim off any fat that has risen to the top and solidified – this is lard – don’t throw it away use it in your savoury cooking in place of cooking oil. It has been proven not to form cancer causing aldehydes when heated, whereas vegetable oils such as sunflower, safflower, canola and to a degree, olive oils do.

Image courtesy of rakratchada torsap at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Vegetarian and Vegan “Bone Broth”

Posted on

Veggie stock

Ingredients:
1 small onion, chopped
2 cloves of garlic, smashed
1 cup shiitake mushrooms, sliced (or regular if shiitake unavailable)
½ chilli, sliced (use more or less depending on how spicy you like it)
1 tablespoon coconut or rice bran oil                                                                                                          1 Tblespn of dried wakame reconstituted in a bowl of water
1 carrot, chopped
1 rib celery, chopped
5cm piece of ginger, peeled                                                                                                                           5cm piece of turmeric root                                                                                                                             1 bay leaf
2 1/2 litres water
1/2 cup loosely packed coriander leaves                                                                                                 1/4 cup fresh parsley, roughly chopped
1 cup spinach and/or kale
1 tspn sea salt
juice of ½ a lemon
Tamari to taste
1 Tblespn of organic light miso paste
1 tspn spirulina

 

  1. Heat the oil and sauté the onions, garlic, chilli and mushrooms together until soft.
  2. Drain the water off the wakame and combine with carrots, celery, ginger, turmeric and water in a pot, bring to a boil, and then simmer 45 minutes.
  3. Remove from heat and strain.
  4. Combine broth with sautéed mushroom mixture, coriander, spinach, kale, lemon juice, sea salt, tamari, miso and spirulina.
  5. Allow the heat of your broth to wilt the coriander, parsley, spinach and kale.
  6. Ladle into bowls or mugs and enjoy the spicy aroma of this fabulous gut-healing broth.

 

Fish Bone Broth

Posted on

Fish bones

Prep Time: 15 minutes • Cook Time: 1 hour 15 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1-2 non-oily fish carcasses from cod, sole, haddock, hake, etc.
  • 1 Tbs. ghee or butter (use coconut oil for dairy free option)
  • Vegetables: 1 onion or leek, 1-2 carrots, 1-2 celery stalks diced finely
  • 1 cup dry white wine, optional
  • Herbs, optional – 3-4 sprigs thyme, 2 bay leaves, ½ -1 tsp. peppercorns
  • Cold, filtered water, to cover
For extra gelatin (optional)
  • 1-2 fish heads, gills removed
Instructions
  1. Simmer veggies in Ghee, butter or oil over medium heat for about 5-10 minutes. Place fish carcasses, fish heads (if using), herbs and peppercorns over veggies, cover and simmer 5-10 more minutes. This will stimulate the fish to release their flavours before adding the water.
  2. Add wine (if using) and water to cover the carcasses and bring to a simmer and skim scum that forms on the surface. The scum won’t hurt you! It’s just some impurities that get released. This happens in all types of bone broths.
  3. Simmer gently 45-60 minutes.
  4. Strain broth from carcasses and veggies.
  5. Store in the fridge for up to 5 days. Freeze, whatever you won’t use in that time, and use within 3 months

 

Notes:

Non-oily fish is necessary because the fish oils in fatty fish such as salmon become rancid in cooking.

The cartilage in fish bones breaks down to gelatin very quickly, so it’s best to cook broth on the stove top.

Make sure you use the carcasses from non-oily whitefish such as cod, sole, snapper, haddock and hake. Any non-oily fish works fine. Avoid oily fish like salmon, tuna, herring and swordfish (though their flesh works great in chowders and other fish-based soups).

Also, if possible, try to get some fish heads in addition to the carcasses. Generally speaking, you probably won’t get much gelatin from just fish carcasses.

Finally, as opposed to other types of bone broths, be sure to dice the veggies finely. This allows them to release their flavours more efficiently with the shorter cooking time.

Image courtesy of olovedog at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Congee for Gut Health

Posted on

Congee with spoon

Congee with Vegetables

Makes 6-8 servings

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups uncooked brown or white rice (white is better for those with poor digestion)
  • 1 strip of Kombu seaweed
  • 2 Tblespns of coconut oil (can use Ghee instead, unless dairy free)
  • 10 cups vegetable, chicken or turkey stock
  • 1 thumb-sized piece of ginger, finely chopped or grated
  • turmeric root, grated
  • 2 carrots, chopped fine
  • ½ cup shiitake mushrooms, chopped (if available)
  • 1 cup of kale/swiss chard/spinach/cabbage, finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp tamari sauce
  • 1 small bunch spring onions, roughly chopped
  • bunch coriander, to garnish

To make this a vegetarian dish- substitute vegetable stock and consider adding 1/2 cup mung beans – which can add these at the beginning with the rice.

Directions:

Cook the rice in the slow cooker for as long as you can, 3 hours minimum, up to 12, topping up with liquid as needed. During the last hour of cooking, add the ginger, turmeric, carrots, mushrooms, greens and tamari. When cooked, garnish with spring onions and coriander.

Image courtesy of Keerati at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Ginger Tea

Posted on Updated on

ginger

Grate or blend fresh, organic ginger root (if it’s organic, I don’t usually peel it), put 1 x tablespoon of root and it’s juice into the mesh of a glass teapot, cover with boiling water and leave to steep for five minutes.

Pour into cups and have as it is or add a little bit of honey and even lemon or lime juice to taste.

I usually grate up a large amount and put into ice cube trays to freeze. Then it’savailable whenever I need it!

So good for warming the blood, improving the circulation, reducing inflammation and soothing sore, aching joints. Brilliant for nausea (have without the honey or citrus for this).

ginger tea

Image courtesy of Praisaeng at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of OZphotography at FreeDigitalPhotos.net