Winter

Rice and Cottage Cheese Pie; Low Allergy, Low Histamine and Low Salicylate

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rice-pie

Prep time: 40 minutes
Cooking time: 1 hour

Serves: 6

Ingredients;

  • Ricebran oil, for greasing
  • 100 g (½ cup) brown or Basmati long-grain rice
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh chives
  • 30 g (1 oz) butter, melted
  • 90 g (⅓ cup) cottage cheese
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten

Filling;

  • 60 g (2¼ oz) butter
  • 5 spring onions (scallions) chopped
  • 4 eggs
  • 250 g (1 cup) cottage cheese
  • 1 x cup of spinach (omit for salicylate sensitivity)
  • Ground sea salt

Directions;

  1. Preheat the oven to 170°C
  2. Lightly grease a 23 cm (9 in) flan tin or pie plate with ricebran oil.
  3. Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil.
  4. Add the rice and cook for 12 minutes, or until very tender, stirring occasionally.
  5. Drain and cool. You will need 1½ cups of cold cooked rice for this recipe.
  6. Combine the cooled rice with the chives, butter, cottage cheese and eggs and press into the base and sides of prepared pan.
  7. Chill for 30 minutes.

For the filling;

  1.  Melt the butter in a small saucepan over low heat.
  2. Add the spring onions and cook for 8-10 minutes, or until soft, but not brown.
  3. Remove from the heat.
  4. Cool.
  5. Combine the eggs, cottage cheese and a pinch of salt in a bowl.
  6. Add the spring onion mixture and mix well.
  7. Pour the filling into the prepared crust.
  8. Bake for 40-45 minutes, or until firm and golden brown.
  9. Serve the pie hot or cold.

HINT: The rice should be very well cooked and slightly mushy. This can be achieved by stirring it once or twice during cooking.

Chicken Broth Low Allergy, Low Salicylate and Low Amines

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clear-broth

Ingredients;

  • 6 litres of cold, filtered water or enough to cover the chicken (I recommend using a very large pot so you get lots of broth).
  • 2- 3 FRESH organic chicken carcasses and skin-less chicken meat (1kg of chicken in total). (skinless chicken is necessary to reduce histamines)
  • 2 onions, quartered (if salicylate intolerant, use leeks and spring onions)
  • 1-2 carrot, quartered (if salicylate intolerant, use swede)
  • 3 sticks of celery
  • Several sprigs of fresh thyme (omit if salicylate intolerant)
  • A bunch of parsley
  • A generous pinch of celtic, rock, Himalayan or sea salt
  • 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar (omit if salicylate intolerant)

Directions;

  • Place the meat, water and vinegar in a large saucepan, cover with a lid and let stand for 30 minutes. This will give time to the vinegar to start drawing minerals from the bones into the water.
  • Bring to the boil.
  • Over the next half hour, a foam-like scum will rise to the surface. Skim it several times.
  • When no more foam is surfacing, add the vegetables, thyme and and salt and reduce heat to simmer.
  • Cook for 2-4 hours.
  • Ten minutes before the end add the parsley. This will increase the mineral content of the broth.
  • After cooking, remove carcasses and veggies with slotted spoon and strain into a container.
  • The broth can then be stored in pint-sized glass containers in the fridge. Chill well before freezing.

Onion, Garlic and Honey Cough Syrup

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Ingredients;

Onion and Garlic

  • 1 onion, diced into pieces or sliced into slices
  • 4-5 cloves garlic, crushed
  • Raw, unfiltered honey, or a combination of raw honey and Manuka honey, (enough to cover the onions and garlic)

Method;

  1. In a jar or pot (if heating, see below), place your onions and crushed garlic cloves.
  2. Pour in the honey until the onions and garlic are covered.
  3. Either leave to steep for a few hours (or overnight) or
  4. Place the pot over a very low heat (don’t heat too much or you will lose all the healing properties of the honey)
  5. Cook for 30-60 minutes.  When the onions and garlic soften, and the honey becomes more liquefied, you know that your syrup is ready.

Honey

You can either leave the onion and garlic pieces in the syrup or simply strain the syrup through a fine mesh strainer.  Store it in a jar in your fridge and use it freely.

Porridge using soaked oats

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Jar of oats

Ingredients:

 

  • 1 cup oats, rolled or cracked – NOT the quick cooking kind, but the ‘old fashioned’ whole oats (organic is best)
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 2 Tblespns plain whole milk yogurt, whey, kefir or buttermilk
  • 1 cup water

OPtional Extra’s;

  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • 1 Tblespns ground nuts & seeds such as; Brazil, almonds, walnuts, pepita’s, sunflower seeds & flax seeds.(Don’t use these if diverticulitis is an issue)
  • Adding psyllium husks, chia seeds and slippery elm will increase the fibre content. (Don’t use chia seeds if diverticulitis is an issue)
  • Coconut sugar, rapadura sugar, raw honey or real maple syrup (not maple flavouring) to sweeten.
  • Touch of butter, ghee, cream or milk, optional, but especially good for the kids
  • Other nice optional additions include; grated apple, chopped dried fruit such as; sulphur-free apricots, figs, sultanas or cranberries.

healthy breakfast ingredients

Preparation:

 

Mix the oats with warm water and whey or yogurt, cover and leave out (preferably not in the fridge unless the nights are hot) for at least 7 hours or overnight. In the morning, bring an additional cup of water to a boil with the sea salt. Add the soaked oats, reduce the heat, cover and simmer for several minutes. Remove from heat, stir in optional flax seeds and other fibre and let stand for a few minutes. Serve with the ghee, butter or cream and sugar, honey or real maple syrup.

 

Embed from Getty Images

 

Image courtesy of Mister GC at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of KEKO64 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Cauliflower “white” sauce, gluten free, GAPS & Paleo friendly

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Cauliflower

Ingredients:

  • 8 large cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 5-6 cups cauliflower florets
  • 6-7 cups vegetable broth or water
  • 1 teaspoon salt (more to taste)
  • ½ teaspoon pepper (more to taste)
  • ½ cup milk (more to taste). You can use any kind of milk including almond, rice or oat milk.
Directions:
  1. Saute the minced garlic with the butter in a large frypan over a low heat. Cook for several minutes or until the garlic is soft and fragrant but not browned (browned or burnt garlic will taste bitter). Remove from heat and set aside.
  2. Bring the water or vegetable broth to a boil in a large pot. Add the cauliflower and cook, covered, for 7-10 minutes or until cauliflower is fork tender. Do not drain.
  3. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the cauliflower pieces to the blender. Add 1 cup vegetable broth or cooking liquid, sauteed garlic/butter, salt, pepper, and milk. Blend or puree for several minutes until the sauce is very smooth, adding more broth or milk depending on how thick you want the sauce. You may have to do this in batches depending on the size of your blender. Serve hot! If the sauce starts to look dry, add a few drops of water, milk, or olive oil.
Notes
Adding olive oil can help keep the sauce really smooth and adds a delicious flavour. Adding grated Parmesan or other hard cheeses such as tasty or goat’s or sheeps milk cheese is also yum!
pasta carbonara
Image courtesy of James Barker at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of tiramisustudio at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Cauliflower Cheesey Bread; GAPS & Paleo friendly

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cauliflower cheesey bread

    • 1 head cauliflower, riced
    • 1/2 cup shredded Mozzarella or a hard Goat’s or Sheep’s milk cheese
    • 1/2 cup shaved Parmesan cheese
    • 1 large egg
    • 1/2 tablespoon freshly minced garlic
    • 1/2 tablespoon freshly chopped basil
    • 1/2 tablespoon freshly chopped Italian flat-leaf parsley
    • 1 teaspoon oregano
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
    • 3/4 cup shredded Mozzarella Cheese (or grated Goat’s or Sheep’s milk cheese)

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 220C
  2. Chop the cauliflower florets into chunks and steam them in a steamer or on the stove until slightly soft for 15 minutes. Grate or process in a blender to resemble rice. Alternatively, grate cauliflower or process cauliflower and cook as cauliflower rice. See recipe here;  https://equilibriumnaturalhealth.com/2017/04/04/cauliflower-rice-paleo-g-f-low-carb/
  3. One large head should produce approximately 3 cups of riced cauliflower.

To Make the Bread:

  1. Place baking paper over a baking tray or pizza stone
  2. Wring out as much water from the cauliflower rice as possible
  3. In a medium bowl, stir together the cauliflower, Parmesan, Mozzarella (or Goats or Sheep’s milk cheese) and egg. Add basil, parsley, oregano, crushed garlic and salt & pepper and mix together to combine.
  4. Transfer to the baking tray or pizza stone, and using your hands, pat out into a large rectangle
  5. Bake at 220C  for 15 minutes, or until the cheese has melted and turned golden.
    Remove from oven.
  6. Slice and serve!

Bone Broth GAPS and Paleo friendly

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Meat stew

BONE BROTH

Ingredients

  • 2 kg of bones – (beef and lamb knuckle bones or marrow bones, chicken necks, whole or carcass from a roast. You can have different bones together or separate, depending on the flavour of stock you’re after)
  • 8 litres of filtered water
  • 1 x whole bulb of garlic; cloves, separated, peeled and crushed
  • 3 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar (organic, unfiltered)
  • 2 x carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • 2 x celery stalks, coarsely chopped
  • 2 x onions, halved and peeled
  • 1 x can whole, peeled or diced tomatoes (optional)
  • 2 x bay leaves
  • 1 x bunch fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • ½ bunch fresh or dried thyme
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Place all ingredients in a large crockpot or slow cooker and set the heat to high.
  2. Bring the stock to a boil, then reduce the heat setting to low.
  3. Allow the stock to cook for a minimum of 4 hours and up to 24-48 hours or more, (depending on the size of the bones, chicken will need less, lamb and beef can cook for longer). The longer the bones brew the better! Remember to keep topping up the water you as you don’t want it to boil dry.
  4. Turn off the cooker and allow the stock to cool slightly.
  5. Strain the stock through a fine mesh metal strainer and throw away all the debris (I often keep the chunks of meat if they’re easily removed, and add them into a soup)
  6. Place the cooled stock into glass jars for storage in the fridge (for up to a few days) or pour into freezer-safe containers for later use. I also freeze some in ice-cube trays so that I can add a couple of cubes to cooking as needed.

When the broth is fully cooled, look for a gelatinous consistency. That means your broth is gelatin-rich!  Sometimes the gelatin breaks down if the cooking is longer or hotter and your broth won’t appear gelatinous, but it is still full of gelatin and other wonderful minerals. I don’t skim off any of the fat, I heat my broth and drink it warm.  If you like, you can skim off any fat that has risen to the top and solidified – this is lard – don’t throw it away use it in your savoury cooking in place of cooking oil. It has been proven not to form cancer causing aldehydes when heated, whereas vegetable oils such as sunflower, safflower, canola and to a degree, olive oils do.

Image courtesy of rakratchada torsap at FreeDigitalPhotos.net